[:en]Motion with constant velocity[:de]Bewegung mit konstanter Geschwindigkeit[:pb]Movimento uniforme[:es]Movimiento rectilíneo uniforme[:]

[:en]

Kinematics is a branch of physics studies with the motion of a body or bodies without consideration of the forces involved.

Motion with constant velocity

Constant velocity means that the velocity does not change in the time period we are looking at. This is also referred to as a uniform velocity. The velocity and time can be recorded over time:

Constant Velocity - Velocity-Time Graph and Position-time graph

Constant Velocity - Velocity-Time Graph and Position-time graph

The Greek letter ∆ (spocken "delta") stands for `difference`. The difference of the distance ∆s can also be negative, i.e. Δs < 0. In our example, this would be the case if the car is moving backwards.

The greater the speed, the steeper the course of the straight line in the s(t)-graph.

The value that the function s(t) takes at a given time t corresponds to the area between the v(t) characteristic and the t-axis. Thus, the distance traveled is calculated: s(t) = v × t


Multidimensional motions with constant velocity

The rules for one-dimensional motions can be applied to two- or three-dimensional motions. The velocity can be divided into the single components (x-, y- and z). The analysis of the individual components is needed, for example, for the addition of velocities. We will take a closer look at three-dimensional motion:

Multidimensional motions with constant velocity

Multidimensional motions with constant velocity


Adding velocities

If two motions are rectilinear in the same direction, the resulting velocity can be obtained by simply adding the two velocity amounts v1 and v2.

Example treadmill in the airport: A person moves with a speed v1 on a treadmill within the airport with the treadmill speed v2. The amounts of both speeds add up. The resulting speed v of the person (relative to the ground) is thus vtot = v1 + v2.

If the velocities are at any angle to each other, the resulting velocity is determined by vector addition - either graphically or mathematically.

Example: A boat crosses a river vertically at a speed v1 = 3 m/s; the flow velocity of the river is v2 = 1 m/s.

Addition of velocities - vector addition

Addition of velocities - vector addition

Our example corresponds to a two-dimensional motion, i.e. motion in a plane. The motion divided into x- and y-component results in:

The value of the resulting velocity can be determined via Pythagoras:

The angle of the resulting velocity can be determined by an angular function. We choose the tangent:

Back to our example:

[:de]

[:]

[:en]

[:de]

Kinematik ist ein Teilgebiet der Physik, welches sich mit möglichen Bewegungen eines Körpers oder Körper befasst ohne dass die beteiligten Kräfte (d. h. der Ursachen und Wirkungen der Bewegungen) berücksichtigt werden.

Bewegungen mit konstanter Geschwindigkeit

Konstante Geschwindigkeit bedeuted, dass sich die Geschwindigkeit in dem Zeitraum, den wir betrachten, nicht ändert. Man spricht hier auch von einer gleichförmigen Geschwindigkeit. Die Geschwindigkeit und Zeit können über die Zeit aufgezeichnet werden:

Gleichförmige Geschwindigkeit - Geschwindigkeit - Weg-Diagramm

Gleichförmige Geschwindigkeit - Geschwindigkeit - Weg-Diagramm

  • Das ∆-Symbol (griechisch Buchstabe, sprich „Delta“) steht dabei für „Differenz“. Die Differenz der Wegstrecke kann auch negativ sein, d.h. Δs < 0. In unserem Beispiel wäre dies der Fall, wenn das Auto rückwärtsfährt.
  • Umso größer die Geschwindigkeit ist, desto steiler ist der Verlauf der Geraden im s(t)-Diagramm.
  • Der Wert, den die Funktion s(t) zu einer bestimmten Zeit annimmt, entspricht der Fläche zwischen der v(t)-Kennlinie und der t-Achse. Damit errechnet sich der zurückgelegte Weg: s(t) = v × t

Mehrdimensionale Bewegungen mit konstanter Geschwindigkeit

Die Gesetzmäßigkeiten für eindimensionale Bewegungen lassen auf zwei- bzw. dreidimensionale Bewegungen übertragen. Dabei lässt sich die Geschwindigkeit in die einzelnen Komponenten (x-, y- und z) aufteilen. Die Betrachtung der einzelnen Komponenten wird z.B. bei der Addition von Geschwindigkeiten benötigt. Wir betrachten die dreidimensionale Bewegung näher:

Gleichförmige Geschwindigkeit im mehrdimensionalen Raum

Gleichförmige Geschwindigkeit im mehrdimensionalen Raum


Addition von Teilgeschwindigkeiten

Verlaufen zwei Bewegungen geradlinig in gleicher Richtung, so kann man die resultierende Geschwindigkeit durch einfache Addition der beiden Geschwindigkeitsbeträge v1 und v2 erhalten.

Verlaufen zwei Bewegungen geradlinig in gleicher Richtung, so kann man die resultierende Geschwindigkeit durch einfache Addition der beiden Geschwindigkeitsbeträge v1 und v2 erhalten.

Beispiel Laufband im Flughafen: Eine Person bewegt sich mit einer Geschwindigkeit v1 auf einem Laufband im Flughafen mit der Laufbandgeschwindigkeit v2. Die Beträge beider Geschwindigkeiten addieren sich. Die resultierende Geschwindigkeit v der Person (relativ zum Erdboden) ist somit vres = v1 + v2.

Stehen die Geschwindigkeiten in einem beliebigen Winkel zueinander, ermittelt man die resultierende Geschwindigkeit durch Vektoradditionzeichnerisch oder rechnerisch.

Beispiel: Ein Boot überquert mit einer Geschwindigkeit v1 = 3 m/s senkrecht einen Fluss; die Fließgeschwindigkeit des Flusses beträgt v2 = 1 m/s.

Addition von Geschwindigkeiten - Vektoraddition

Addition von Geschwindigkeiten - Vektoraddition

Unser Beispiel entspricht einer zweidimensionalen Bewegung, d.h. Bewegung in einer Ebene. Die Bewegung aufgeteilt in x- und y-Komponente ergibt:

Der Betrag der resultierenden Geschwindigkeit kann über den Pythagoras ermittelt werden: 

Der Winkel der resultierenden Geschwindigkeit kann über eine Winkelfunktion bestimmt werden. Wir wählen den Tangens:

Zurück zu unserem Beispiel:

[:]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *